Description

Philosophy is the critical study of the fundamental concepts and assumptions involved in all central areas of human experience, including religion, morality, science, and art. The department offers an introduction to philosophy course designed for the general student, as well as introductory courses in logic and current issues.

The basic philosophy curriculum includes courses in the history of philosophy covering the period which begins with the development of rational inquiry by the philosophers of ancient Greece and which concludes with the construction of the modern philosophical systems of the Enlightenment as well as courses in each of the major fields of philosophical study: ethics, which is concerned with the basis of morality; metaphysics, which explores different views about what fundamentally exists; epistemology, which examines the nature and limits of human knowledge; and logic, which studies general methods of reasoned argument and analysis.

A number of courses reflect the role of philosophy in investigating the fundamental concepts and assumptions of other disciplines, including courses in medical ethics, the philosophy of law, the philosophy of science, and the philosophy of mathematics.

Other courses focus on the role of philosophy in the critical analysis of basic evaluative conceptions and assumptions. Courses in political philosophy critically examine the evaluative concepts and assumptions involved in our beliefs about government, individual liberty, and social and economic justice. Courses in the philosophy of religion do the same for beliefs about the nature and existence of God and about the relations between faith and knowledge.

The department also offers courses in aesthetics, the philosophical study of art, music, and literature understood as fundamental forms of human culture and significant expressions of the human spirit.

The interdisciplinary character of philosophy, together with its focus on evaluative issues and its unique emphasis on general methods of reasoned argument and analysis, leads to an unusually broad and intellectually sound major for students preparing themselves for such professions as law, medicine, social work, government service, and the ministry. The philosophy major is indispensable for those who wish to prepare for a career as a philosopher within a college or university setting.

College Requirements

College Admission

College Admission

The entrance requirements for the College of Arts and Sciences are the same as the UNL General Admission Requirements. Students who are admitted through the Admission by Review process may have certain conditions attached to their enrollment at UNL. These conditions are explained under “Removal of Deficiencies.”

In addition to these requirements, the College of Arts and Sciences strongly recommends a third and fourth year of one foreign language. Four years of high school coursework in the same language will fulfill the College of Arts and Sciences’ language requirement. It will also allow students to continue language study at a more advanced level at UNL, and provide more opportunity to study abroad.

Transfer Students

To be considered for admission as a transfer student, Nebraska resident or nonresident, students must have an accumulated average of C (2.0 on a 4.0 scale) and a minimum C average in the last semester of attendance at another college. Transfer students who graduated from high school January 1997 and after must also meet the UNL General Admission Requirements. Those transfer students who graduated before January 1997 must have completed in high school, 3 years of English, 2 years of the same foreign language, 2 years of algebra, and 1 year of geometry. Transfer students who have completed less than 12 credit hours of college study must also submit either their ACT or SAT scores.

Ordinarily, hours earned at a similarly accredited college or university are applicable to the UNL degree.  The College, however, will evaluate all hours submitted on an application for transfer, and reserves the right to accept or reject any of them, based upon its exclusion and restriction policies. Sixty is the maximum number of hours the University will accept on transfer from a two-year college or international institution. Transfer credit in the major or minor must be approved by the departmental advisor on a Request for Substitution Form to meet specific course requirements, group requirements, or course level requirements in the major or minor. At least half of the hours in the major field must be completed at the University regardless of the number of hours transferred.

The College of Arts and Sciences will accept no more than 15 semester hours of C- and D grades from other schools. The C- and D grades cannot be applied toward requirements for a major or minor. This policy does not apply to the transfer of grades from UNO or UNK to UNL. All D grades may be transferred from UNO or UNK, but they are not applicable to a major or minor.

Readmitted Students

UNL students who choose not to take courses for more than 2 consecutive terms, must reapply to UNL.  Students readmitted to the College of Arts and Sciences will follow the requirements stated in the catalog for the academic year of readmission and re-enrollment as a degree-seeking student in Arts and Sciences. In consultation with advisors, a student may choose to follow a catalog for any academic year in which they are admitted to and enrolled as a degree-seeking student at UNL in the College of Arts and Sciences. Students must complete all degree requirements from a single catalog year. Beginning in 1990-1991, the catalog which a student follows for degree requirements may not be more than 10 years old at the time of graduation.

Admission Deficiencies/Removal of Deficiencies

Students must remove entrance deficiencies in geometry and foreign language as soon as possible, and before graduating from the College of Arts and Sciences.  For questions and more information, students should consult a college advisor in the Academic and Career Advising Center in 107 Oldfather Hall.

Removing Foreign Language Deficiencies

Students must complete the second semester of a first year language sequence to clear the deficiency and the second semester of the second year language sequence to complete the college graduation requirement in language.

Removing Geometry Deficiencies

A deficiency of one year of geometry can be removed by taking high school geometry courses through an approved independent study program, or by completing a geometry course from an accredited community college or a four-year institution. Neither of these options will count for college credit.

College Degree Requirements

College Distribution Requirements

Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science (16 hours + Language)

The College of Arts and Sciences distribution requirements are designed to further the purposes of liberal education by encouraging study in several different areas within the College. All requirements are in addition to University ACE requirements. A student may not use a single course to satisfy more than one of the following five distribution requirements. A student cannot use a single course to satisfy both an ACE outcome and a College distribution requirement. A student cannot use a course from their primary major to satisfy the Breadth Requirement (F), but may apply an ancillary requirement of the primary major or a course from their second major toward this requirement. Independent study or reading courses and internships cannot be used to satisfy distribution requirements. To see a complete list of excluded courses, run a degree audit through MyRED.

Courses from interdisciplinary programs will count in the same area as courses from the home/cross-listed department(s).
 

College Distribution Requirements
CDR A - Written Communication3
Select from courses approved for ACE outcome 1.
CDR B and BL - Natural, Physical, and Mathematical Sciences with Lab4
Select from biochemistry, biological sciences, chemistry, computer science, geology, meteorology, mathematics, physics and statistics. Must include one lab in the natural or physical sciences. Lab courses may be selected from biochemistry, biological sciences, chemistry, geology, meteorology and physics. Select courses from geography1 and anthropology1 may also be used to satisfy the lab requirement.
CDR C - Humanities3
Select from classics2, English, history, modern languages and literatures2, philosophy, and religious studies2.
CDR D - Social Science3
Select from: anthropology3, communication studies, geography3, political science, psychology3, or sociology.
CDR E - Language0-16
Fulfilled by the completion of the 6-credit-hour second-year sequence in a single foreign language in one of the following departments: Classics and religious studies, modern languages and literatures, or anthropology. Instruction is currently available in Arabic, Chinese, Czech, French, German, Greek, Japanese, Latin, Omaha, Russian, and Spanish. A student who has completed the fourth-year level of one foreign language in high school is exempt from the languages requirement.
CDR F - Additional Breadth3
Select from: natural, physical and mathematical sciences (Area B), humanities (Area C), or social sciences (Area D). Cannot be a course from the primary major.
Credit Hours Subtotal: 16-32
1

See degree audit or a College of Arts and Sciences advisor for approved geography and anthropology courses that apply as natural science.

2

Language courses numbered 210 or below apply only for the foreign language requirement.

3

See degree audit or College of Arts and Sciences advisor for list of natural/physical science courses in anthropology, geography, and psychology that do not apply as social science.

Scientific Base

Bachelor of Science Only (60 hours)

The bachelor of science degree requires students to complete 60 hours in mathematical, physical and natural sciences. Approved courses for scientific base credit come from the following College of Arts and Sciences disciplines: actuarial science, anthropology (selected courses), astronomy, biochemistry (excluding BIOC 101), biological sciences (excluding BIOS 203), chemistry (excluding CHEM 101), computer science (excluding CSCE 10), geography (selected courses), geology, life sciences, mathematics (excluding courses below MATH 104), meteorology, microbiology, physics and statistics.

See your degree audit or a College of Arts and Sciences advisor for a complete list including individual classes that fall outside of the disciplines listed above. Up to 12 hours of scientific and technical courses offered by other colleges may be accepted toward this requirement with approval of a college advisor.

Foreign Languages/Language Requirement

Languages Exemption Policy

UNL and the College of Arts and Sciences will exempt or waive students from the UNL entrance requirement of two years of the same foreign language or from the College’s language distribution requirement based on documentation only. The following are the options and procedures for documentation:

High School Transcripts

For the University entrance requirement, students must show an official high school transcript with two or more years of the same foreign language.

For the College of Arts and Sciences College Distribution Requirement E-Language, students must show an official high school transcript with four or more years of the same foreign language in high school, or show evidence of graduation from a non-English-speaking foreign high school. Students whose native language is not English must show English as a Second Language study on an official high school transcript. Four years of ESL at the high school level (9th, 10th, 11th and 12th grades) will be the basis for a waiver of the CDR E Language requirement.

Proficiency Examination at UNL

For the University entrance requirement, students who do not have transcript documentation can request to take a proficiency exam in the language. (This is not the same test as the Modern Languages Placement Exam.) However, UNL will provide testing only in the languages it teaches. Currently, these languages are: Arabic, French, German, Spanish, Russian, Czech, Japanese, Chinese.

For the College of Arts and Sciences College Distribution Requirement E-Language, the Department of Modern Languages will oversee the test at the 202 level. If the student passes the test, the department will sign the College Request for Waiver form and indicate the level of proficiency. The form is then forwarded to the Arts and Sciences Advising Center for approval.

The Department of Modern Languages will oversee the test and provide written documentation to the Arts and Sciences Advising Center the level of proficiency passed.

Distance Education

For the University entrance requirement, students without transcript documentation who claim proficiency in a language not taught at UNL, have the option of seeking out a distance education program in languages. If the student completes the equivalent of 102 from an approved distance education program, the student will meet the UNL entrance requirement. The student must have the course work approved before he/she takes/completes the course as equivalent to 102 by a College advisor. The student then completes the course and has the distance education program send the transcript to the Admissions Office.

For the College of Arts and Sciences College Distribution Requirement E-Language, the student can seek out a distance education program and complete the equivalent of the 202-level course. The student must submit the request on the College Request for Substitution form and have the course work approved by a College advisor. The student then completes the course and has the distance education program send the transcript to the Admissions Office.

Third Language Option

If a student demonstrates knowledge of two foreign languages at the 102 level, the College of Arts and Sciences may consider waiving two semesters of the four semester College Distribution Requirement E-Languages requirement. If this waiver were granted, the student would then be required to complete 101 and 102 in another, 3rd foreign language at UNL.

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation

A minimum of 120 semester hours of credit is required for graduation from the College of Arts and Sciences. A total grade point average of at least 2.0 is required.

Grade Rules

Restrictions on C- and D Grades

The College will accept no more than 15 semester hours of C- and D grades from other schools except for UNO and UNK. No transfer C- and D grades can be applied toward requirements in a major or a minor. No UNL C- and D grades can be applied toward requirements in a major or a minor.

Pass/No Pass Privilege

University regulations for the Pass/No Pass (P/N) privilege state:

  • The Pass/No Pass option is designed for your use by seeking to expand your intellectual horizons by taking courses in areas where you may have had minimal preparation.
  • Neither the P nor the N grade contribute to your GPA.
  • P is interpreted to mean C or above.
  • A change to or from a Pass/No Pass may be made until mid-term (see academic calendar for specific dates per term).
  • The Pass/No Pass or grade registration cannot conflict with the policy of the professor, department, college, or University governing the grading option.
  • Changing to or from Pass/No Pass requires using the MyRED system to change the grading option or filing a Drop/Add form with the Office of the University Registrar, 107 Canfield Administration Building. After mid-term of the course, a student registered for Pass/No Pass cannot change to a grade registration unless the Pass/No Pass registration is in conflict with the policy of the professor, department, college, or University governing Pass/No Pass.
  • The Pass/No Pass grading option cannot be used for the removal of C- or D or F grades.

Pass/No Pass privileges in the College of Arts and Sciences are extended to students according to the following additional regulations:

  • Pass/No Pass hours can count toward fulfillment of University ACE requirements and college distribution requirements up to the 24-hour maximum.
  • Most Arts and Sciences departments and programs do not allow courses graded Pass/No Pass to apply to the major or minor. Students should refer to the department’s or program’s section of the catalog for clarification. By college rule, departments can allow up to 6 hours of Pass/No Pass in the major or minor.
  • Departments may specify that certain courses of theirs can be taken only on a P/N basis.
  • The college will permit no more than a total of 24 semester hours of P/N grades to be applied toward degree requirements. This total includes all Pass grades earned at UNL and other U.S. schools. NOTE: This 24-hour limit is more restrictive than the University regulation.

Grading Appeals

A student who feels that he/she has been unfairly graded must ordinarily take the following sequential steps in a timely manner, usually by initiating the appeal in the semester following the awarding of the grade:

  1. Talk with the instructor concerned. Most problems are resolved at this point.
  2. Talk to the instructor’s department chairperson.
  3. Take the case to the Grading Appeal Committee of the department concerned. The Committee should be contacted through the department chairperson.
  4. Take the case to the College Grading Appeals Committee by contacting the Dean’s Office, 1223 Oldfather Hall.

Course Level Requirements

Courses Numbered above 299

Thirty of the 120 semester hours of credit must be in courses numbered above 299. Of the 30 hours above 299, 15 hours (1/2) must be completed in residence at UNL.

Graduate Courses

Seniors in the University who have obtained in advance the approval of the dean for Graduate Studies may receive up to 12 hours credit for graduate courses taken in addition to the courses necessary to complete their undergraduate work, provided that such credits are earned within the calendar year prior to receipt of the baccalaureate. For procedures, inquire at the Office of Graduate Studies.

Course work taken prior to receipt of the baccalaureate may not always be accepted for transfer to other institutions as graduate work.

Residency

Residency Requirement and Open Enrollment and Summer Independent Study Courses

Students must complete at least 30 of the 120 total hours for their degree at UNL. Students must complete at least 1/2 of their major course work including 6 hours above 299 in their major, and 15 of the 30 hours required above 299 in residence. Credit earned during education abroad may be used toward the residency requirement if students register through UNL and participate in prior-approved education abroad programs. UNL open enrollment and summer independent study courses count toward residence.

ACE Requirements

Consistent with the mission and values of the University, ACE is based on a shared set of four institutional objectives and ten student learning outcomes. The ACE program was approved by faculty in all eight undergraduate colleges and endorsed by the Faculty Senate, the student government, and the Academic Planning Committee in January 2008 for implementation in the fall 2009. ACE aligns with current national initiatives in general education.

Key characteristics of ACE demonstrate the benefits of the program to students:
 

  • Students receive a broad education with exposure to multiple disciplines, critical life skills and important reasoning, inquiry, and civic capacities.
  • ACE is simple and transparent for students, faculty and advisors. Students complete the equivalent of 3 credit hours for each of the ten student learning outcomes.
  • Students connect and integrate their ACE experiences with their selected major.
  • Students can transfer all ACE certified courses across colleges within the institution to meet the ACE requirement and any course from outside the institution that is directly equivalent to a UNL ACE-certified course. Courses from outside institutions without direct equivalents may be considered with appropriate documentation for ACE credit (see academic advisor).

ACE allows faculty to assess and improve their effectiveness and facilitate students’ learning.

ACE Institutional Objectives and Student Learning Outcomes

To meet the ACE Program requirement, a student will complete a minimum of 3 credit hours for each of the ten ACE Student Learning Outcomes (a total of 30 ACE credit hours). See the ACE website at: http://ace.unl.edu for the most current information and the most recently certified courses.

Catalog Rule

Students must fulfill the requirements stated in the catalog for the academic year in which they are first admitted to and enrolled as a degree-seeking student at UNL. In consultation with advisors, a student may choose to follow a subsequent catalog for any academic year in which they are admitted to and enrolled as a degree-seeking student at UNL in the College of Arts and Sciences. Students must complete all degree requirements from a single catalog year. Beginning in 1990-1991 the catalog which a student follows for degree requirements may not be more than 10 years old at the time of graduation.

Learning Outcomes

Majors in philosophy will be able to:

  1. Write clear and persuasive argumentative essays.
  2. Interpret complex philosophical texts.
  3. Critically explain major issues and positions in the history of philosophy, value theory, and metaphysics/epistemology.
  4. Analyze arguments using formal logic.
  5. Reason philosophically.

Major Requirements

Thirty (30) hours of philosophy, with at least 24 hours in courses numbered 200 or above, and at least 12 hours in courses numbered 300 or above.

Core Requirements

PHIL 400Undergraduate Seminar in Philosophy3
Total Credit Hours3

 Specific Major Requirements

Logic
Select at least one of the following:3
Introduction to Logic and Critical Thinking
Introduction to Modern Logic
Credit Hours Subtotal: 3
History of Philosophy
Select at least one of the following:3
History of Philosophy (Ancient)
History of Philosophy (Modern)
Ethics: Ancient and Medieval
Knowledge: Ancient and Medieval
Metaphysics: Ancient and Medieval
Credit Hours Subtotal: 3
Value Theory
Select at least one of the following:3
Ethical Theory
Topics in Applied Ethics
Advanced Social Political Philosophy
Credit Hours Subtotal: 3
Metaphysics and Epistemology
Select at least one of the following:3
Theory of Knowledge
Introduction to Metaphysics
Introduction to Philosophy of Language
Problems in the Philosophy of Mind
Philosophy of Science
Credit Hours Subtotal: 3
Additional Philosophy Courses
Select 18 hours18
Credit Hours Subtotal: 18
Total Credit Hours30

Recommended Courses for Pre-Law Students: logic (PHIL 110, PHIL 211); philosophy of law (PHIL 230); ethics and political philosophy (PHIL 221, PHIL 320, PHIL 325); and theory of knowledge (PHIL 301).

Additional Major Requirements

Grade Rules

C- and D Grades

A grade of C or above is required for all courses in the major and minor.

Pass/No Pass

No course taken Pass/No Pass will be counted toward the major or minor.

Prerequisite Requirements/Rules

The prerequisite for 300-level courses are typically 3 hours of philosophy or permission. The prerequisite for 400-level courses are typically 9 hours of philosophy or permission.

Requirements for Minor Offered by Department

Fifteen (15) hours in philosophy courses including:

  • At least 12 hours at the 200 level or above and at least 6 hours at the 300 level or above;
  • At least one course in each of two areas: Logic, History of Philosophy, Value Theory, or Metaphysics and Epistemology. See course choices in the major section.

Grade Rules

C- and D Grades

A grade of C or above is required for all courses in the major and minor.

Pass/No Pass

No course taken Pass/No Pass will be counted toward the major or minor.

PHIL101
Introduction to Philosophy

Description: Historical-cultural introduction to philosophy. Considers a broad range of philosophical problems in relation to the major historical and cultural conditions which have influenced their formulations and proposed solutions. Topics: the principles of rational inquiry; the nature of knowledge; the metaphysics of mind, world, and God; and the sources and authority of morality.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Course Format:LEC
ACE Outcomes: ACE 8 Civic/Ethics/Stewardship ACE 5 Humanities

Credit Hours:3

ACE:ACE 8 Civic/Ethics/Stewardship ACE 5 Humanities

PHIL105
The Philosophy of Food

Description: A wide-ranging examination of the philosophical, political, social, and economic aspects of food, its production and consumption. Topics include the ethical treatment of animals, factory farming, food justice, the relation of food to social and religious identity, and climate change.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Course Format:LEC
ACE Outcomes: ACE 5 Humanities ACE 8 Civic/Ethics/Stewardship

Credit Hours:3

ACE:ACE 5 Humanities ACE 8 Civic/Ethics/Stewardship

PHIL106
Philosophy and Current Issues

Description: Critical survey of current issues and the role of philosophy in attempts to resolve them. Recent topics: sexual morality, pornography and the law, capital punishment, sexism and racism, extraordinary treatment for the terminally ill, abortion, church and state, and nuclear war and disarmament.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Course Format:LEC
ACE Outcomes: ACE 8 Civic/Ethics/Stewardship ACE 9 Global/Diversity

Credit Hours:3

ACE:ACE 8 Civic/Ethics/Stewardship ACE 9 Global/Diversity

PHIL110
Introduction to Logic and Critical Thinking

Description: Introduction to the principles of correct reasoning and their application. Emphasis on improving skills of thinking and reading critically, analyzing and evaluating arguments objectively, and constructing sound arguments based on relevant evidence.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Course Format:LEC
ACE Outcomes: ACE 3 Math/Stat/Reasoning

Credit Hours:3

ACE:ACE 3 Math/Stat/Reasoning

PHIL116
Philosophy and Religious Belief

Description: Introduction to philosophical issues about the nature and justification of religious belief. Issues include the conception of God in Judaism and Christianity; the role of faith, reason, and religious experience in religious belief; the traditional arguments for the existence of God; the problem of evil; the idea of immortality; the relations between religion and science and religion and morality.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Course Format:LEC

Credit Hours:3

ACE:

PHIL189H
University Honors Seminar

Prerequisites: Good standing in the University Honors Program or by invitation.

Description: Topic varies.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Course Format:LEC

Credit Hours:3

ACE:

PHIL211
Introduction to Modern Logic

Description: Introduction to symbolic logic. The semantics and syntax of sentential and predicate logic. Translating into and from formal languages, determining the validity or invalidity of arguments, and constructing proofs within formal systems.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Course Format:LEC
ACE Outcomes: ACE 3 Math/Stat/Reasoning

Credit Hours:3

ACE:ACE 3 Math/Stat/Reasoning

PHIL213
Medical Ethics

Description: Philosophical study of moral problems in modern medicine, exploring such issues as the allocation of scarce medical resources, patients rights, research on human subjects, abortion, the care of seriously impaired newborns, and socialized medicine and the right to health care.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Course Format:LEC
ACE Outcomes: ACE 5 Humanities ACE 8 Civic/Ethics/Stewardship

Credit Hours:3

ACE:ACE 5 Humanities ACE 8 Civic/Ethics/Stewardship

PHIL216
Introduction to Psychology and Philosophy

Description: Exploration of a number of topics to which both psychological research and philosophical reflection are relevant. Includes two kinds of cases: where psychological findings bear on the resolution of some traditional philosophical issues and where philosophical analysis and criticism can be helpful in understanding or assessing a psychological theory or finding.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Course Format:LEC
ACE Outcomes: ACE 5 Humanities

Credit Hours:3

ACE:ACE 5 Humanities

PHIL218
Philosophy of FeminismCrosslisted with WMNS 218

Description: Fundamental assumptions and philosophical foundations of varieties of feminist thought. Nature of gender, gender identity, sex differences, and the role of science in defining sex and gender.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Course Format:LEC
ACE Outcomes: ACE 9 Global/Diversity ACE 5 Humanities

Credit Hours:3

ACE:ACE 9 Global/Diversity ACE 5 Humanities

PHIL220
Elements of Ethics

Description: Wide range of basic issues in ethical theory, typically including: the nature of justice; the objectivity of moral values; the source of moral obligation; and the conditions of the good life. Each issue approached through historically important texts such as Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics, Kant's Groundwork, and Mill's Utilitarianism.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Course Format:LEC
ACE Outcomes: ACE 5 Humanities

Credit Hours:3

ACE:ACE 5 Humanities

PHIL221
Political Philosophy

Description: Basic concepts and problems of political theory. Freedom, equality, democracy, justice, and the relation of the individual to the state.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Course Format:LEC
ACE Outcomes: ACE 8 Civic/Ethics/Stewardship ACE 5 Humanities

Credit Hours:3

ACE:ACE 8 Civic/Ethics/Stewardship ACE 5 Humanities

PHIL221H
Honors: Political Philosophy

Prerequisites: Good standing in the University Honors Program or by invitation.

Description: Basic concepts and problems of political theory. Freedom, equality, democracy, justice, and the relation of the individual to the state.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Course Format:LEC

Credit Hours:3

ACE:

PHIL223
Introduction to the Philosophy of History

Description: Nature and grounds of historical knowledge; objectivity vs. subjectivity in the writing of history; historical explanation; and patterns in human history. Primary sources include Hegel, Marx, and Toynbee.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Course Format:LEC

Credit Hours:3

ACE:

PHIL225
Environmental Ethics

Description: Ethical dimensions in human relations to the environment. What is the nature of moral value generally, and what are the range of things that are morally valuable? Are there things that are fundamentally morally valuable beyond humans or human happiness (i.e., sentient creatures, ecosystems, and species)? What is the right thing to do given various answers to such value questions?

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Course Format:LEC
ACE Outcomes: ACE 9 Global/Diversity ACE 8 Civic/Ethics/Stewardship

Credit Hours:3

ACE:ACE 9 Global/Diversity ACE 8 Civic/Ethics/Stewardship

PHIL230
Philosophy of Law

Description: Philosophical problems of the law and of legal systems. Includes legal reasoning, judicial interpretation, legal language and definition, legal obligation, law and morality, and legal paternalism. Concepts of law, constitutionality, legislative intent, fair trial, criminal responsibility, punishment, fault, and strict liability. Applications to social issues of individual freedom, human rights, privacy, discrimination, and justice.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Course Format:LEC
ACE Outcomes: ACE 5 Humanities ACE 8 Civic/Ethics/Stewardship

Credit Hours:3

ACE:ACE 5 Humanities ACE 8 Civic/Ethics/Stewardship

PHIL231
History of Philosophy (Ancient)

Description: Beginnings of Greek philosophy: the pre-Socratics and the systems of Plato and Aristotle with emphasis on historical connections and the critical interpretation of texts.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Course Format:LEC
ACE Outcomes: ACE 5 Humanities

Credit Hours:3

ACE:ACE 5 Humanities

PHIL232
History of Philosophy (Modern)

Description: Survey of the more important systems in Western philosophy in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries with emphasis on historical connections and the critical interpretation of texts.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Course Format:LEC

Credit Hours:3

ACE:

PHIL265
Philosophy of Religion

Description: Introduction to the philosophical understanding of religion. Includes a number of views on the nature of God, on the possibility of knowledge of God's existence through either argumentation or religious experience, and on the relation between religion and morality.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Course Format:LEC
ACE Outcomes: ACE 5 Humanities ACE 9 Global/Diversity

Credit Hours:3

ACE:ACE 5 Humanities ACE 9 Global/Diversity

PHIL299
Independent Study in Philosophy

Prerequisites: Permission.

Course details
Credit Hours:1-3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Course Format:IND

Credit Hours:1-3

ACE:

PHIL301
Theory of Knowledge

Prerequisites: 3 hrs philosophy or permission.

Description: Introduction to some major problems of epistemology, with emphasis on the understanding and evaluation of the problems, rather than on learning what various philosophers have said about them. Treats such questions as the nature and scope of knowledge; the sources of knowledge in perception, memory, and reasoning; the nature of evidence and its relation to knowledge; the possibility of knowledge of the mental lives of others; the nature and justification of inductive reasoning; and the concept of causality and its relation to explanation.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Course Format:LEC
ACE Outcomes: ACE 5 Humanities

Credit Hours:3

ACE:ACE 5 Humanities

PHIL302
Introduction to Metaphysics

Prerequisites: 3 hrs philosophy or permission.

Description: Introduction to some main problems, and some central concepts, of metaphysics. Focuses on the nature of being and existence, and on various questions concerning the relations between different kinds of entities: minds and bodies, causes and effects, universals and particulars, etc.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Course Format:LEC
ACE Outcomes: ACE 5 Humanities

Credit Hours:3

ACE:ACE 5 Humanities

PHIL305
Introduction to Philosophy of Language

Prerequisites: 3 hrs PHIL.

Description: Major themes and classic texts in philosophy of language. The notion of meaning, the relationships between meaning and reference, meaning and truth, and the meaning and use of expressions.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Course Format:LEC

Credit Hours:3

ACE:

PHIL314
Problems in the Philosophy of Mind

Description: Major problems in the philosophy of mind: the relation between the mental and the physical; the role of mental concepts in explaining human actions; the possibility of life after death; the concept of a person; the structure of character and personality; and the analysis of various important mental concepts, such as thought, belief, desire, emotion, sensation, and pleasure.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Course Format:LEC

Credit Hours:3

ACE:

PHIL317
Philosophy of Science

Prerequisites: 3 hrs philosophy or permission.

Description: Critical analysis of the philosophical foundations of the sciences. Nature of theories, observation in science, the interpretation of theories, the scientific method, explanation, interfield relations, patterns of scientific development, and the role of philosophy in science studies in general.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Course Format:LEC

Credit Hours:3

ACE:

PHIL320
Ethical Theory

Prerequisites: 3 hrs PHIL

Description: Morality, considering the major views in normative ethics as well as a broad range of questions in theoretical ethics centering on the nature of morality and its place in human life.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Course Format:LEC
ACE Outcomes: ACE 8 Civic/Ethics/Stewardship ACE 5 Humanities

Credit Hours:3

ACE:ACE 8 Civic/Ethics/Stewardship ACE 5 Humanities

PHIL323
Topics in Applied Ethics

Prerequisites: 3 hrs philosophy or permission

Description: Application of systematic moral theories to specific moral issues. Issues of social justice and environmental, journalistic and medical ethics.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Course Format:LEC
ACE Outcomes: ACE 8 Civic/Ethics/Stewardship

Credit Hours:3

ACE:ACE 8 Civic/Ethics/Stewardship

PHIL325
Advanced Social Political Philosophy

Prerequisites: 3 hrs philosophy or permission.

Description: Various competing contemporary philosophical approaches to issues of social justice, with special attention to issues of individual rights, political liberty, and distributive justice.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Course Format:LEC
ACE Outcomes: ACE 9 Global/Diversity ACE 8 Civic/Ethics/Stewardship

Credit Hours:3

ACE:ACE 9 Global/Diversity ACE 8 Civic/Ethics/Stewardship

PHIL327
Aesthetics

Prerequisites: 3 hrs PHIL

Description: Critical exposition of the main classical and contemporary theories of art: Expressionist, Formalist, and Representationalist. Theories considered in definition of art, of aesthetic judgment, of art criticism, and of aesthetic value. Examples drawn from painting, literature, music, and movies.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Course Format:LEC
ACE Outcomes: ACE 5 Humanities ACE 7 Arts

Credit Hours:3

ACE:ACE 5 Humanities ACE 7 Arts

PHIL332
Spinoza

Prerequisites: 3 hrs philosophy or permission.

Description: Philosophy of Spinoza, focusing on his principal work, the Ethics. Various metaphysical and epistemological aspects of Spinoza's thought, including his ideas on the nature and existence of God, the relation between mind and body, and relations between language, truth and reason.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Course Format:LEC
ACE Outcomes: ACE 5 Humanities

Credit Hours:3

ACE:ACE 5 Humanities

PHIL333
History of Philosophy (19th Century)

Description: An examination of the more important philosophical systems and dominant intellectual trends of the nineteenth century. Representative works of philosophers such as Fiche, Schelling, Hegel, Schopenhauer, Kierkegaard, Marx, Nietzsche, and Mill will be studied.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Course Format:LEC

Credit Hours:3

ACE:

PHIL336
Ethics: Ancient and Medieval

Prerequisites: 3 hrs philosophy or permission.

Description: Ancient and medieval theories of morality. Connection between self-interest and morality, what morality is, and pleasure.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Course Format:LEC
ACE Outcomes: ACE 5 Humanities

Credit Hours:3

ACE:ACE 5 Humanities

PHIL337
Knowledge: Ancient and Medieval

Prerequisites: 3 hrs philosophy or permission.

Description: Ancient and medieval knowledge, focusing on perception, faith, and thought.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Course Format:LEC
ACE Outcomes: ACE 5 Humanities

Credit Hours:3

ACE:ACE 5 Humanities

PHIL338
Metaphysics: Ancient and Medieval

Prerequisites: 3 hrs philosophy or permission.

Description: Ancient and medieval metaphysical theories, focusing on persons, gods, and properties.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Course Format:LEC
ACE Outcomes: ACE 5 Humanities

Credit Hours:3

ACE:ACE 5 Humanities

PHIL340
Contemporary Analytical Philosophy

Prerequisites: 3 hrs philosophy or permission.

Description: Development of 20th century philosophy in the English speaking world. Realism, skepticism, reference, and representation. Figures include Frege, Moore, Russell, Wittgenstein, Lewis, and Ryle. Developments in each of the major fields of philosophy, including ethics.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Course Format:LEC

Credit Hours:3

ACE:

PHIL341
Contemporary Continental Philosophy

Prerequisites: 3 hrs philosophy or permission.

Description: Recent developments in continental philosophy, in particular of different forms of social criticism which it has generated. Includes discussion of Marxists, Foucault and other philosophers influenced by Nietzsche, Wittgenstein, the existentialists, and Derrida. The language of social science; the controversy between problems of the issue the ethics of and the relation.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Course Format:LEC
ACE Outcomes: ACE 5 Humanities

Credit Hours:3

ACE:ACE 5 Humanities

PHIL342
American Philosophy

Prerequisites: 3 hrs philosophy or permission.

Description: Development of American Pragmatism from 1870's to the present. Essential writings of C. S. Peirce, William James, and John Dewey; other currents in American thought such as Critical Realism and Idealism; and contemporary philosophic views that continue the spirit of pragmatism.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Course Format:LEC

Credit Hours:3

ACE:

PHIL345
Modern European Jewish PhilosophyCrosslisted with JUDS 345

Prerequisites: 3 hrs PHIL.

Description: Survey of Jewish philosophy from the eighteenth century to the present. Works of Moses Mendelssohn, Hermann Cohen, Martin Buber, Emanuel Levinas, and others in relation to broad European intellectual movements such as existentialism and phenomenology.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Course Format:LEC
ACE Outcomes: ACE 5 Humanities

Credit Hours:3

ACE:ACE 5 Humanities

PHIL398
Special Topics in Philosophy

Prerequisites: Permission.

Course details
Credit Hours:1-4
Max credits per semester:4
Max credits per degree:4
Course Format:LEC

Credit Hours:1-4

ACE:

PHIL399
Independent Study in Philosophy

Prerequisites: Permission.

Course details
Credit Hours:1-24
Max credits per semester:24
Max credits per degree:24
Course Format:IND

Credit Hours:1-24

ACE:

PHIL399H
Honors Course

Prerequisites: Open to candidates for degrees with distinction, with high distinction, and with highest distinction in the College of Arts and Sciences.

Course details
Credit Hours:1-4
Max credits per semester:4
Max credits per degree:4
Course Format:IND

Credit Hours:1-4

ACE:

PHIL400
Undergraduate Seminar in Philosophy

Prerequisites: Philosophy major and permission of philosophy undergraduate advisor.

Description: Central philosophical problems or the work of some significant philosopher. Reading of primary sources, the interpretation of philosophical texts, and the writing of research papers.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Course Format:LEC
ACE Outcomes: ACE 10 Integrated Product

Credit Hours:3

ACE:ACE 10 Integrated Product

PHIL405
Philosophy of LanguageCrosslisted with PHIL 805

Prerequisites: 9 hrs philosophy or permission

Description: Introduction to some of the basic concepts and problems in the philosophy of language. Topics to be discussed include reference, definite descriptions, names, demonstratives, truth, meaning, speech acts, and the logic of expressions involving so-called "propositional attitudes." Authors studied include Frege, Russell, Tarski, Austin, Grice, Strawson, Quine, Kripke, Kaplan and Davidson.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Course Format:LEC

Credit Hours:3

ACE:

PHIL409
Theory of KnowledgeCrosslisted with PHIL 809

Prerequisites: 9 hrs philosophy or permission

Description: Intensive study of basic problems in the Theory of Knowledge: the nature of knowledge, the analysis of perception and memory, the justification of induction, the problem of how one knows other minds, and the analysis of a prior knowledge. Readings from recent work.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Course Format:LEC

Credit Hours:3

ACE:

PHIL411
Formal LogicCrosslisted with PHIL 811

Prerequisites: PHIL 211 or equivalent.

Description: The main metalogical results of the twentieth century. Completeness, compactness and undecidability of first-order logic; the Löwenheim-Skolem Theorem; axiomatic set theory; the Gödel incompleteness theorems; and non-classical logics.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Course Format:LEC

Credit Hours:3

ACE:

PHIL412
Modal LogicCrosslisted with PHIL 812

Prerequisites: 9 hrs philosophy including PHIL 211 or equivalent or permission.

Description: Syntax and model theory of quantified modal logic with applications to e.g., deontic logic, epistemic logic, and the philosophy of logic.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Course Format:LEC

Credit Hours:3

ACE:

PHIL414
Philosophy of MindCrosslisted with PHIL 814

Prerequisites: 9 hrs philosophy or permission

Description: Main problems in the philosophy of mind, including dualism and materialism, instrumentalism and eliminativism, wide and narrow content, qualia, and mental causation.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Course Format:LEC

Credit Hours:3

ACE:

PHIL418
MetaphysicsCrosslisted with PHIL 818

Prerequisites: 9 hrs philosophy or permission

Description: Intensive study of main problems in metaphysics, especially universals and particulars, the relation of mind and matter, the categories of the real, criteria of identity, and existential propositions. Readings from recent philosophers.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Course Format:LEC

Credit Hours:3

ACE:

PHIL420
Philosophy of Social ScienceCrosslisted with PHIL 820

Prerequisites: 9 hrs philosophy or permission

Description: The epistemological character of the social sciences. Character and explanatory role of social scientific generalizations, various explanatory strategies for social matters, the continuity or discontinuity of the social sciences with the special sciences, the importance of interpretation, and the place of rationality.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Course Format:LEC

Credit Hours:3

ACE:

PHIL423
Advanced EthicsCrosslisted with PHIL 823

Prerequisites: 9 hrs philosophy or permission

Description: Critical study of leading theories in ethics, with close attention to major works, chiefly modern and contemporary. Includes naturalism, intuitionism, emotivism, utilitarianism, Neo-Kantian ethics, and various current positions.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Course Format:LEC

Credit Hours:3

ACE:

PHIL425
Political and Social PhilosophyCrosslisted with PHIL 825

Prerequisites: 9 hrs philosophy or permission

Description: Critical study of main problems and leading theories in social and political philosophy. Origin and justification of political obligation, with emphasis on social contact theories; the nature and foundation of individual rights and the strength of these rights when they conflict with each other and with concern for the common good; the principles of social justice and the obligation to protect the welfare of others; and the concepts of personal autonomy, liberty, equality, and freedom. Readings from a combination of historical and recent work, and emphasis on relating the various issues to current problems in society.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Course Format:LEC

Credit Hours:3

ACE:

PHIL450
Ancient PhilosophyCrosslisted with PHIL 850

Prerequisites: 9 hrs philosophy or permission

Description: Advanced survey of ancient philosophy from the pre-Socratics through Aristotle, concentrating on central epistemological and metaphysical issues.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Course Format:LEC

Credit Hours:3

ACE:

PHIL460
History of Modern PhilosophyCrosslisted with PHIL 860

Prerequisites: 9 hrs philosophy or permission

Description: Advanced survey of early European philosophy from the late renaissance through the Enlightenment, concentrating on central epistemological and metaphysical issues.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Course Format:LEC

Credit Hours:3

ACE:

PHIL471
KantCrosslisted with PHIL 871

Prerequisites: 9 hrs philosophy or permission

Description: Kant's philosophy, and of problems in the interpretation of his writings. The primary text will be the First Critique.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Course Format:LEC

Credit Hours:3

ACE:

PHIL496
Philosophical ThemesCrosslisted with PHIL 896

Prerequisites: Open to graduate students and, with the consent of the instructor, to seniors and especially qualified juniors

Description: Library work and conferences.

Course details
Credit Hours:1-24
Max credits per semester:24
Max credits per degree:24
Course Format:IND
ACE Outcomes: ACE 10 Integrated Product

Credit Hours:1-24

ACE:ACE 10 Integrated Product

PLEASE NOTE
This document represents a sample 4-year plan for degree completion with this major. Actual course selection and sequence may vary and should be discussed individually with your college or department academic advisor. Advisors also can help you plan other experiences to enrich your undergraduate education such as internships, education abroad, undergraduate research, learning communities, and service learning and community-based learning.

Career Information

The following represents a sample of the internships, jobs and graduate school programs that current students and recent graduates have reported.

Transferable Skills

  • Communicate clearly using different forms of writing to and for a variety of different audiences
  • Analyze and interpret difficult texts
  • Defend and discuss complex issues from multiple angles
  • Understand and utilize a variety of research methodologies
  • Form developed world views and global perspectives

Jobs of Recent Graduates

  • Strategic Analyst, BrabenderCox - Washington DC
  • Assistant Account Manager, FACTS Management - Lincoln NE
  • Library Service Associate, City of Lincoln - Library Department - Lincoln NE
  • Crop Consultant, Malmstrom Agronomics - Cotesfield NE
  • Personal Banker, Union Bank Trust - Lincoln NE

Internships

  • Community Development Intern, Nebraska Dept of Economic Development - Lincoln NE
  • Child Welfare Intern, Nebraska Appleseed - Lincoln NE
  • Marketing Intern, Madonna Rehabilitation Hospital - Lincoln NE

Grad Schools

  • Law, University of Nebraska Law School - Lincoln NE
  • Juris Doctorate, University of Chicago - Chicago IL
  • Ph.D. in Economics, University of California-Irvine - Irvine CA
  • J.D., Baylor University - Waco TX
  • Masters in Cinema and Media Studies, University of California-Los Angeles - Los Angeles CA