Description

Website: business.unl.edu/academic-programs/departments/finance/actuarial-science

An actuary is a mathematically-oriented business person who will most likely be a manager or supervisor at some point in his/her career. A major in actuarial science is an excellent educational background for prospective actuaries.

The actuarial science program is designed to prepare students for the current industry demands. Because the demands change on a regular basis, oftentimes the number of hours, the sequencing of courses, and the specific requirements change for this major. Students should continue to consult with the department for the appropriate selection and listing of course requirements.

All actuarial science students are encouraged to visit the actuarial science program’s website and an actuarial science program faculty advisor for more information about the program, including the Actuarial Science Club, sequencing of courses, scholarship opportunities, and the requirements for achieving professional actuarial designations.

College Admission

The entrance requirements for the College of Arts and Sciences (CAS), including any of the majors or minors offered through the college, are the same as the UNL General Admission Requirements. In addition to these requirements, the College of Arts and Sciences strongly recommends a third and fourth year of one foreign language in high school. Four years of high school coursework in the same language will fulfill the College of Arts and Sciences’ language requirement. It will also allow students to continue language study at a more advanced level at UNL and provide more opportunity to study abroad.

ACADEMIC AND CAREER Advising

Academic and Career Advising Center

The Academic and Career Advising Center in 107 Oldfather Hall is the undergraduate hub for CAS students in all majors. Centrally located and easily accessed, students encounter friendly, knowledgeable people who are eager to help. Students visit the Advising Center in 107 Oldfather Hall to:

  • Choose or change their major, minor, or degree program.
  • Check in on policies, procedures, and deadlines.
  • Get a college approval signature from the Dean's representative, Sr. Director of Advising and Student Success.

While the assigned academic advisor should be the student's primary contact, there are daily walk-ins from 12-3 where a general academic advisor can answer a quick question. In addition, the CAS Career Coaches are located here. They help students explore majors and minors, gain experience, and develop a plan for life after graduation. Not sure where to go or who to ask? The Advising Center team can help.

Assigned Academic Advisors

Academic advisors are critical resources dedicated to students' academic, personal, and professional success. Every CAS student is assigned an academic advisor based on their primary major. Since most CAS students have more than just a single major, it is important to get to know the advisor for any minors or additional majors. Academic advisors work closely with the faculty to provide the best overall support and the discipline-specific expertise.

Assigned advisors are listed in MyRED and their offices may be located in or near the department of the major for which they advise or in the Academic and Career Advising Center. Students who have declared a pre-health or pre-law area of interest will also work with advisors in the Exploratory and Pre-Professional Advising Center (Explore Center) in 127 Love South, who are specially trained to guide students preparing to enter a professional school.

For complete and current information on advisors for majors, minors, or pre-professional areas, contact the Arts and Sciences Academic and Career Advising Center, 107 Oldfather Hall, 402-472-4190, http://cas.unl.edu/advising.

Career Coaching

The College believes that Academics + Experience = Opportunities and encourages students to complement their academic preparation with real-world experience, including internships, research, education abroad, service, and leadership. Arts and sciences students have access to a powerful network of faculty, staff, and advisors dedicated to providing information and support for their goals of meaningful employment or advanced education. Arts and sciences graduates have unlimited career possibilities and carry with them important career competencies—communication, critical thinking, creativity, context, and collaboration. They have the skills and adaptability that employers universally value. Graduates are not only prepared to effectively contribute professionally in the real world, but they have a solid foundation to excel in an increasingly global, technological, and interdisciplinary world.

Students should contact the career coaches in the Arts and Sciences Academic and Career Advising Center in 107 Oldfather, or their assigned advisor, for more information. The CAS career coaches help students explore career options, identify ways to build experience, and prepare to apply for internships, jobs, or graduate school, including help with resumes, applications, and interviewing.

ACE Requirements

 Students must complete one course for each of the ACE Student Learning Outcomes below. Certified course choices are published in the degree audit, or visit the ACE website for the most current list of certified courses.

ACE Student Learning Outcomes
ACE 1 : Write texts, in various forms, with an identified purpose, that respond to specific audience needs, integrate research or existing knowledge, and use applicable documentation and appropriate conventions of format and structure.
ACE 2: Demonstrate competence in communication skills.
ACE 3: Use mathematical, computational, statistical, logical, or other formal reasoning to solve problems, draw inferences, justify conclusions, and determine reasonableness.
ACE 4: Use scientific methods and knowledge to pose questions, frame hypotheses, interpret data, and evaluate whether conclusions about the natural and physical world are reasonable.
ACE 5: Use knowledge, historical perspectives, analysis, interpretation, critical evaluation, and the standards of evidence appropriate to the humanities to address problems and issues.
ACE 6: Use knowledge, theories, and research perspectives such as statistical methods or observational accounts appropriate to the social sciences to understand and evaluate social systems or human behaviors.
ACE 7: Use knowledge, theories, or methods appropriate to the arts to understand their context and significance.
ACE 8: Use knowledge, theories, and analysis to explain ethical principles and their importance in society.
ACE 9: Exhibit global awareness or knowledge of human diversity through analysis of an issue.
ACE 10: Generate a creative or scholarly product that requires broad knowledge, appropriate technical proficiency, information collection, synthesis, interpretation, presentation, and reflection.

College Degree Requirements

College Distribution Requirements – BA and BS

The College of Arts and Sciences distribution requirements are common to both the bachelor of arts and bachelor of science degrees and are designed to ensure a range of courses. By engaging in study in several different areas within the College, students develop the ability to learn in a variety of ways and apply their knowledge from a variety of perspectives. All requirements are in addition to University ACE requirements, and no course can be used to fulfill both an ACE outcome and a College Distribution Requirement.

  • A student may not use a single course to satisfy more than one College Distribution Requirement, with the exception of CDR Diversity. Courses used to meet CDR Diversity may also meet CDR Writing, CDR Humanities, or CDR Social Science.
  • Independent study or reading courses and internships cannot be used to satisfy distribution requirements.
  • Courses from interdisciplinary programs will be applied in the same area as courses from the home/cross-listed department.
College Distribution Requirements
CDR: Written Communication3
Select from courses approved for ACE outcome 1.
CDR: Natural, Physical, and Mathematical Sciences with Lab4
Select from biochemistry, biological sciences, chemistry, computer science, geology, meteorology, mathematics, physics, and statistics. Must include one lab in the natural or physical sciences. Lab courses may be selected from biochemistry, biological sciences, chemistry, geology, meteorology, and physics.
Some courses from geography and anthropology may also be used to satisfy the lab requirement above. 1
CDR: Humanities3
Select from classics, English, history, modern languages and literatures, philosophy, and religious studies. 2
CDR: Social Science3
Select from anthropology, communication studies, geography, political science, psychology, or sociology. 3
CDR: Human Diversity in U.S. Communities0-3
Select from a set of approved courses as listed in the degree audit.
CDR: Language0-16
Fulfilled by the completion of the 6-credit-hour second-year sequence in a single foreign language in one of the following departments: Classics and religious studies or modern languages and literatures. Instruction is currently available in Arabic, Chinese, Czech, French, German, Greek, Japanese, Latin, Russian, and Spanish.
A student who has completed the fourth-year level of one foreign language in high school is exempt from the languages requirement, but encouraged to continue on in their language study.
Credit Hours Subtotal: 13-32

Language Requirement

UNL and the College of Arts and Sciences place great value on academic exposure and proficiency in a second language. The UNL entrance requirement of two years of the same foreign language or the College’s language distribution requirement (CDR: Language) will rarely be waived and only with relevant documentation. See the main College of Arts and Sciences page for more details.

Scientific Base - BS Only

The bachelor of science degree requires students to complete 60 hours in mathematical, physical, and natural sciences. Approved courses for scientific base credit come from the following College of Arts and Sciences disciplines: actuarial science, anthropology (selected courses), astronomy, biochemistry (excluding BIOC 101), biological sciences (excluding BIOS 100 or BIOS 203), chemistry (excluding CHEM 101), computer science (excluding CSCE 10), geography (selected courses), geology, life sciences, mathematics (excluding courses below MATH 104), meteorology, microbiology (excluding MBIO 101), and physics.

See your Degree Audit or your assigned academic advisor for a complete list, including individual classes that fall outside of the disciplines listed above. Up to 12 hours of scientific and technical courses offered by other colleges may be accepted toward this requirement with approval of the College of Arts and Sciences. See your assigned academic advisor to start the approval process.

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation

A minimum of 120 semester hours of credit is required for graduation from the College of Arts and Sciences. A cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0 is required.

Grade Rules

Restrictions on C- and D Grades

The College will accept no more than 15 semester hours of C- and D grades from other domestic institutions except for UNO and UNK. All courses taken at UNO and UNK impact the UNL transcript. No transfer of C- and D grades can be applied toward requirements in a major or a minor. No UNL C- and D grades can be applied toward requirements in a major or a minor. International coursework (including education abroad) with a final grade equivalent to a C- or lower will not be validated by College of Arts and Sciences departments to be degree applicable.

Pass/No Pass Privilege

The College of Arts and Sciences adheres to the University regulations for the Pass/No Pass (P/N) privilege with the following additional regulations:

  • Pass/No Pass hours can count toward fulfillment of University ACE requirements and college distribution requirements up to the 24-hour maximum.
  • Most arts and sciences departments and programs do not allow courses graded Pass/No Pass to apply to the major or minor. Students should refer to the department’s or program’s section of the catalog for clarification. By college rule, departments can allow up to 6 hours of Pass/No Pass in the major or minor.
  • Departments may specify that certain courses of theirs can be taken only on a P/N basis.
  • The college will permit no more than a total of 24 semester hours of P/N grades to be applied toward degree requirements. This total includes all Pass grades earned at UNL and other U.S. schools. NOTE: This 24-hour limit is more restrictive than the University regulation.

Grading Appeals

A student who feels that he/she has been unfairly graded must ordinarily take the following sequential steps in a timely manner, usually by initiating the appeal in the semester following the awarding of the grade:

  1. Talk with the instructor concerned. Most problems are resolved at this point.
  2. Talk to the instructor’s department chairperson.
  3. Take the case to the Grading Appeal Committee of the department concerned. The Committee should be contacted through the department chairperson.
  4. Take the case to the College Grading Appeals Committee by contacting the Dean’s Office, 1223 Oldfather Hall.

Course Level Requirements

Courses Numbered at the 300 or 400 Level

Thirty (30) of the 120 semester hours of credit must be in courses numbered at the 300 or 400 level. Of those 30 hours, 15 hours (1/2) must be completed in residence at UNL.

Residency Requirement

Students must complete at least 30 of the 120 total hours for their degree at UNL. Students must complete at least 1/2 of their major coursework, including 6 hours at the 300 or 400 level in their major and 15 of the 30 hours required at the 300 or 400 level, in residence. Credit earned during education abroad may be used toward the residency requirement only if students register through UNL.

Catalog to Use

Students must fulfill the requirements stated in the catalog for the academic year in which they are first admitted to and enrolled as a degree-seeking student at UNL. In consultation with advisors, a student may choose to follow a subsequent catalog for any academic year in which they are admitted to and enrolled as a degree-seeking student at UNL in the College of Arts and Sciences. Students must complete all degree requirements from a single catalog year. Beginning in 1990-1991, the catalog which a student follows for degree requirements may not be more than 10 years old at the time of graduation.

Learning Outcomes

Graduates of actuarial science will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate the ability to apply the concept of actuarial science in solving problems related to financial security.
  2. Understand the content of the UNL courses that have been approved for the actuarial profession's Validation by Educational Experience (VEE) program for the topics of Economics, Corporate Finance, and Applied Statistics.
  3. Understand the additional considerations in practical applications of actuarial theory, such as assumption setting, Actuarial Standards of Practice, the professional code of conduct, and effective communication.
  4. Understand that being a professional requires that actuarial tasks be completed with the highest regard for personal and professional ethics.
  5. Demonstrate the ability to transition from actuarial theory to actuarial practice and the ability to apply tools that actuaries use in practice to complete actuarial tasks, such as a modern procedural computer programming language, Excel or similar spreadsheet program, and commercially available actuarial software.
  6. Demonstrate the ability to communicate the results of quantitative analysis effectively, both in writing and orally.
  7. Demonstrate the ability to work cooperatively with others.
  8. Understand what is involved in being a member of the actuarial profession, including the types of employment available in an actuarial career and the requirements to become, and remain, a member of the actuarial profession.
  9. Demonstrate the ability to be productive in one or more actuarial roles, including: a. current or developing areas of actuarial practice; b. research designed to deepen or broaden actuarial knowledge; or c. education of aspiring or practicing actuaries.

Major Requirements

Core Requirements

Required Calculus Sequence
MATH 106Calculus I5
MATH 107Calculus II4
MATH 208Calculus III4
Credit Hours Subtotal: 13
Required Statistics and Probability Sequence
STAT 380Statistics and Applications3
STAT 462Introduction to Mathematical Statistics I: Distribution Theory 14
STAT 463Introduction to Mathematical Statistics II: Statistical Inference 24
Credit Hours Subtotal: 11
Required Finance Course
FINA 338Principles of Individual and Corporate Risk Management3
Credit Hours Subtotal: 3
Required Actuarial Science Courses
ACTS 440Interest Theory4
ACTS 470Life Contingencies I3
ACTS 475Actuarial Applications in Practice3
ACTS 95Actuarial Practicum0
Credit Hours Subtotal: 10
Total Credit Hours37

Specific Major Requirements

Actuarial Science Courses
Twelve (12) hours of additional courses to be selected from the list of courses below and in consultation with the faculty advisors. 312
Introduction to Credibility, Smoothing of Data, and Simulation
Survival Models
Actuarial Applications of Applied Statistics
Introduction to Financial Economics
Life Contingencies II
Introduction to Risk Theory
Introduction to Property/Casualty Actuarial Science
Options, Futures and Derivative Securities for Actuarial Science
Credit Hours Subtotal: 12
Total Credit Hours12

Additional Major Requirements

Grade Rules

C- and D Grades

A grade of C or above is required for all courses in the major and minor.

Pass/No Pass

No course taken Pass/No Pass will be counted toward the major or minor.

Requirements for Minor Offered By Department 

At least thirteen (13) hours of actuarial science as indicated below, plus prerequisite courses (MATH 106, MATH 107, MATH 208, and STAT 380, STAT 462, STAT 463).
 

Required Courses
ACTS 440Interest Theory4
ACTS 470Life Contingencies I3
ACTS 475Actuarial Applications in Practice3
One additional ACTS course 3
Credit Hours Subtotal: 13
Total Credit Hours13

Grade Rules

C- and D Grades

A grade of C or above is required for all courses in the major and minor.

Pass/No Pass

No course taken Pass/No Pass will be counted toward the major or minor.

ACTS399
Independent Study

Prerequisites: Permission.

Course details
Credit Hours:1-3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:24
Grading Option:Graded with Option

Credit Hours:1-3

ACE:

ACTS401
Problem Lab: Basic Actuarial Applications of Probability

Prerequisites: MATH 208 or 208H and STAT 462, or parallel, and both with a grade of "Pass" or "C" or better.

Description: Calculus-based probability, both univariate and multivariate, applications to risk management-related problems. Problems as posed in the Society of Actuaries (SOA) Exam "P" and/or Casualty Actuarial Society (CAS) Exam "1". Determination of loss frequency distributions and their characteristics, expected value, variance, and percentiles. Determination of loss severity distributions and their characteristics, expected value, variance, and percentiles. Determination of loss sharing parameters, deductibles, and maximum payments.

Course details
Credit Hours:1
Max credits per semester:1
Max credits per degree:1
Grading Option:Graded

Credit Hours:1

ACE:

ACTS402
Problem Lab: Basic Actuarial Applications of Financial Mathematics

Prerequisites: ACTS 440/840 or parallel

Description: Application of basic mathematics of finance to problems involving valuation of financial transactions. Problems as posed in the "Society of Actuaries (SOA) Exam 'FM'" and/or "Casualty Actuarial Society (CAS) Exam '2'". Determining equivalent measures of interest; estimating the rate of return on a fund; discounting or accumulating a sequence of payments with interest; determining yield rate; length of investment; amounts of investment contributions or amounts of investment returns for various types of financial transactions; and basic calculations involving yield curves, spot rates, forward rates, duration, convexity, immunization and short sales; introduction to financial derivatives (forwards, options, futures, and swaps) and their use in risk management; and introduction to the concept of no-arbitage as a fundamental concept in financial mathematics.

Course details
Credit Hours:1
Max credits per semester:1
Max credits per degree:1
Grading Option:Graded

Credit Hours:1

ACE:

ACTS403
Problem Lab: Actuarial Models - Life Contingencies

Prerequisites: ACTS 470/870, ACTS 471/871, and ACTS 473/873

Description: Problems as posed in the "Society of Actuaries (SOA) Exam 'M'" and/or "Casualty Actuarial Society (CAS) Exam '3'". Survival and severity models; "Markov Chain" models; life contingencies; and "Poisson" processes.

Course details
Credit Hours:1
Max credits per semester:1
Max credits per degree:1
Grading Option:Graded

Credit Hours:1

ACE:

ACTS404
Problem Lab: Construction and Evaluation of Actuarial Models

Prerequisites: ACTS 410 and 425

Description: Problems as posed in the Society of Actuaries (SOA) Exam "C" and/or Casualty Actuarial Society (CAS) Exam "4". Construction of empirical models; construction and selection of parametric models; credibility theory; interpolation and smoothing of data; and simulation.

Course details
Credit Hours:1
Max credits per semester:1
Max credits per degree:1
Grading Option:Graded

Credit Hours:1

ACE:

ACTS405
Problem Lab: Actuarial Models - Financial Economics

Prerequisites: ACTS 440/840 and FINA 467

Description: Problems as posed in the "Society of Actuaries (SOA) Exam 'M'". Interest rate models; rational valuation of derivative securities (option pricing: put-call parity, the binomial model, Black-Scholes formula, and actuarial applications; interpretation of option Greeks and delta-hedging; features of exotic options; an introduction to Brownian motion and Itô's lemma); and risk management techniques.

Course details
Credit Hours:1
Max credits per semester:1
Max credits per degree:1
Grading Option:Graded

Credit Hours:1

ACE:

ACTS410
Introduction to Credibility, Smoothing of Data, and SimulationCrosslisted with ACTS 810

Prerequisites: STAT 463

Description: Full, partial, Buhlmann, and Buhlmann-Straub credibility models. Introduction to empirical Bayes and statistical distributions used to model loss experience. Application of "polynomial splines" to actuarial data. Simulation of "discrete" and "continuous random" variables in context of actuarial models. Simulation to "p-value" of hypothesis test. "Bootstrap method" of estimating the "mean squared error" of an estimator.

This course is a prerequisite for: ACTS 404

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Grading Option:Graded

Credit Hours:3

ACE:

ACTS425
Survival ModelsCrosslisted with ACTS 825

Prerequisites: STAT 463 with a grade of "C" or better

Description: Parametric and tabular survival models. Estimation based on observations that might not be complete. Concomitant variables. Use of population data. Applications to groups with impaired lives.

This course is a prerequisite for: ACTS 404

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Grading Option:Graded

Credit Hours:3

ACE:

ACTS430
Actuarial Applications of Applied StatisticsCrosslisted with ACTS 830

Prerequisites: STAT 463 with a grade of "C" or better

Data sets processed and analyzed using statistical software.

Description: Introduction to forecasting in actuarial science. Simple and multiple regression, instrumental variables, time series methods, and applications of methods in forecasting actuarial variables. Interest rates, inflation rates, and claim frequencies.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Grading Option:Graded

Credit Hours:3

ACE:

ACTS440
Interest TheoryCrosslisted with ACTS 840

Prerequisites: MATH 208 or 208H with a grade of "Pass" or "C" or better, or parallel

Grade only

Description: Application of financial mathematics to problems involving valuation of financial transactions; equivalent measures of interest; rate of return on a fund; discounting or accumulating a sequence of payments with interest; and yield rates, length of investment, amounts of investment contributions or amounts of investment returns for various types of financial transactions; loans and bonds. Introduction to the mathematics of modern financial analysis. Calculations involving yield curves, spot rates, forward rates, duration, convexity, and immunization.

Course details
Credit Hours:4
Max credits per semester:4
Max credits per degree:4
Grading Option:Graded

Credit Hours:4

ACE:

ACTS441
Introduction to Financial EconomicsCrosslisted with ACTS 841

Prerequisites: MATH 208 with grade of "C" or better or concurrent; ACTS 440

Description: Financial mathematics concepts related to short sales, forwards, options, futures, and swaps, and their use in risk management, hedging and investment strategies, fundamental concepts of put-call parity and no-arbitrage, and interest rate models.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Grading Option:Graded

Credit Hours:3

ACE:

ACTS442
Principles of Pension ValuationCrosslisted with ACTS 842

Prerequisites: ACTS 471/871 with a grade of "C" or better

Description: Actuarial cost methods. Determination of normal costs and accrued liability. Effect on valuation results due to changes in experience, assumptions and plan provisions. Valuation of ancillary benefits. Determination of actuarially equivalent benefits at early or postponed retirement and optional forms of payment.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Grading Option:Graded

Credit Hours:3

ACE:

ACTS450
Stochastic Processes for ActuariesCrosslisted with ACTS 850

Prerequisites: STAT 463 with a grade of "C" or better

Description: Introduction to stochastic processes and their applications in actuarial science. Discrete-time and continuous-time processes; Markov chains; the Poisson process; compound Poisson processes; non-homogeneous Poisson processes; arithmetic and geometric Brownian motions. Applications of these processes in computation of resident fees for continuing care retirement communities. Pricing of financial instruments.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Grading Option:Graded

Credit Hours:3

ACE:

ACTS470
Life Contingencies ICrosslisted with ACTS 870

Prerequisites: ACTS 440 and STAT 462, each with a grade of "C" or better

First course of a two-course sequence that includes ACTS 471.

Description: Theory and applications of contingency mathematics in the areas of life and health insurance, annuities, and pensions. Probabilistic models.

This course is a prerequisite for: ACTS 403

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Grading Option:Graded

Credit Hours:3

ACE:

ACTS471
Life Contingencies IICrosslisted with ACTS 871

Prerequisites: ACTS 470 and STAT 462, each with a grade of "C" or better

Second course of a two-course sequence that includes ACTS 470.

Description: Life insurance reserve for models based on a single life. Introduction to multiple life models for pensions and life insurance and to multiple decrement models.

This course is a prerequisite for: ACTS 403; ACTS 442, ACTS 842

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Grading Option:Graded

Credit Hours:3

ACE:

ACTS473
Introduction to Risk TheoryCrosslisted with ACTS 873

Prerequisites: STAT 462 with a grade of "C" or better

Description: Applications of compound distributions in modeling of insurance loss. Continuous-time compound Poisson surplus processes, computation of ruin probabilities, the distributions of the deficit at the time of ruin, and the maximal aggregate loss. The effect of reinsurance on the probability of ruin.

This course is a prerequisite for: ACTS 403

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Grading Option:Graded

Credit Hours:3

ACE:

ACTS474
Introduction to Property/Casualty Actuarial ScienceCrosslisted with ACTS 874

Prerequisites: STAT 462 with a grade of "C" or better.

Description: Mathematical, financial, and risk-theoretical foundations of casualty actuarial science. Risk theory, loss reserving, ratemaking, risk classification, credibility theory, reinsurance, financial pricing of insurance, and other special issues and applications.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Grading Option:Graded

Credit Hours:3

ACE:

ACTS475
Actuarial Applications in PracticeCrosslisted with ACTS 875

Prerequisites: ACTS 471/871; FINA 307/307H or FINA 338

Description: Principles and practices of pricing and/or funding and valuation for life, health, property and liability insurance, and annuities and pension plans. Commercially available actuarial modeling software.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Grading Option:Graded
ACE Outcomes: ACE 10 Integrated Product

Credit Hours:3

ACE:ACE 10 Integrated Product

PLEASE NOTE
This document represents a sample 4-year plan for degree completion with this major. Actual course selection and sequence may vary and should be discussed individually with your college or department academic advisor. Advisors also can help you plan other experiences to enrich your undergraduate education such as internships, education abroad, undergraduate research, learning communities, and service learning and community-based learning.


Actuarial Science (B.S.)

Icon Legend: CriticalCritical
16 HR TERM 1
MATH 106 Core Course
complete MATH 106
5hr
C
MATH 106 will fulfill the ACE 3 requirement.

ACE 1 Written Texts
complete 1 from ACE1
3hr

CDR: Diversity in the US
recommend 1 or more courses
3hr
Complete an approved course related to Diversity in U.S. Communities. See degree audit for choices. This requirement is permitted to overlap with CDR Humanities or CDR Social Science.

CDR: Language
recommend 1 or more courses
5hr
If not complete, choose a language course according to your placement and proficiency. CDR Language is met after 4th level (202) of most languages.
15 HR TERM 2
MATH 107 Core Course
complete MATH 107
4hr
C

ACE 5 Humanities
complete 1 from ACE5
3hr

ACE 6 Social Sciences
complete 1 from ACE6
3hr
ECON 211 is recommended to fulfill the ACE 6 requirement.

CDR: Language
recommend 1 or more courses
5hr
If not complete, choose a language course according to your placement and proficiency. CDR Language is met after 4th level (202) of most languages.
14 HR TERM 3
MATH 208 Core CourseCritical
complete MATH 208
4hr
C
MATH 208 is ideally completed in the third term of enrollment. It becomes critical to your success in the major if not completed by the fourth term of enrollment.

ACTS 440 Core CourseCritical
complete ACTS 440
4hr
C
ACTS 440 is ideally completed in the third term of enrollment. It becomes critical to your success in the major if not completed by the fourth term of enrollment.

CDR: Writing
complete 1 from ACE1
3hr
Complete an additional course approved as ACE 1.

CDR: Language
recommend 1 or more courses
3hr
If not complete, choose a language course according to your placement and proficiency. CDR Language is met after 4th level (202) of most languages.
15 HR TERM 4
STAT 380 Core Course
complete STAT 380
3hr
C

FINA 338 Core Course
complete FINA 338
3hr
C

Actuarial Science Course
recommend 1 or more courses
3hr
C
ACTS 441 is recommended.

ACE 2 Communication Skill
complete 1 from ACE2
3hr
COMM 286 or MRKT 257 are recommended to fulfill the ACE 2 requirement.

CDR: Language
recommend 1 or more courses
3hr
If not complete, choose a language course according to your placement and proficiency. CDR Language is met after 4th level (202) of most languages.
14 HR TERM 5
STAT 462 Core CourseCritical
complete STAT 462
4hr
C
STAT 462 is ideally completed in the fifth term of enrollment. It becomes critical to your success in the major if it is not completed by the fifth term of enrollment.

ACTS 95 Core CourseCritical
complete ACTS 95
0hr
C
ACTS 95 is ideally completed in the fifth term of enrollment. It becomes critical to your success in the major if it is not completed by the seventh term of enrollment.

ACE 4 Sciences
complete 1 from ACE4
3hr

ACE 8 Ethical Principles
complete 1 from ACE8
3hr

Electives
complete Any Course*
4hr
In consultation with your advisor, select elective courses or courses that meet a 2nd major, minor, sci-base or upper level requirement. FINA 363, FINA 467, and MATH 314 are recommended for this term.
16 HR TERM 6
ACTS 470 Core Course
complete ACTS 470
3hr
C

STAT 463 Core Course
complete STAT 463
4hr
C

CDR: Humanities
recommend 1 or more courses
3hr
Complete an approved course from a Humanities discipline: ARAB, CLAS, CZEC, ENGL, FILM, FREN, GERM, GREK, HEBR, HIST, JAPN, LATN, PHIL, RELG, RUSS, SPAN.

CDR: Social Science
recommend 1 or more courses
3hr
Complete an approved course from a Social Science discipline: ANTH, COMM, GEOG, NSST, POLS, PSYC, SOCI.

Electives
complete Any Course*
3hr
In consultation with your advisor, select elective courses or courses that meet a 2nd major, minor, sci-base or upper level requirement. FINA 467 is recommended for this term.
15 HR TERM 7
Actuarial Science Course
recommend 1 or more courses
6hr
C
ACTS 471 and ACTS 473 are suggested in term 7.

ACE 7 Arts
complete 1 from ACE7
3hr

CDR: Science/Math
complete 1 from Approved Science Courses
3hr
Complete an approved course from a Math or Science discipline with a lab: ASTR, BIOC, BIOS, CHEM, CSCE, GEOL, LIFE, MATH, METR, PHYS (select ANTH or GEOG allowed).

CDR: Science Lab
complete 1 from ASCLAB1
1hr
Complete an approved lab associated with a course from a Math or Science discipline: ASTR, BIOC, BIOS, CHEM, CSCE, GEOL, LIFE, MATH, METR, PHYS (select ANTH or GEOG allowed).

Electives
complete Any Course*
2hr
In consultation with your advisor, select elective courses or courses that meet a 2nd major, minor, sci-base or upper level requirement.
15 HR TERM 8
ACTS 475 Core Course
complete ACTS 475
3hr
C
ACTS 475 will fulfill the ACE 10 requirement.

Actuarial Science Course
recommend 1 or more courses
3hr
C
ACTS 474 is recommended.

ACE 9 Global/Human Divers
complete 1 from ACE9
3hr
ECON 321 is recommended to fulfill the ACE 9 requirement.

Electives
complete Any Course*
6hr
In consultation with your advisor, select elective courses or courses that meet a 2nd major, minor, sci-base or upper level requirement. FINA 461 is recommended this term.
Graduation Requirements
  1. A minimum 2.00 GPA required for graduation.
  2. ***Total Credits Applying Toward 120 Total Hours***
  3. Complete 30 hours in residence at UNL.
    4. Complete 30 hours at the 300 or 400 level.
    5. Complete 60 hours of Scientific-Base courses in the Natural and Mathematical Sciences.

Career Information

The following represents a sample of the internships, jobs and graduate school programs that current students and recent graduates have reported.

Transferable Skills

  • Apply mathematical and scientific skills to solve real-world problems
  • Develop basic techniques of statistical analysis
  • Make predictions using mathematical, statistical, and scientific modeling methods
  • Analyze and explain data
  • Support and communicate claims using clear evidence
  • Collaborate with a team to develop solutions
  • Confidently navigate complex, ambiguous projects and environments
  • Understand and operate within ethical framework for professional work in the field
  • Use quantitative analysis techniques
  • Use qualitative analysis techniques

Jobs of Recent Graduates

  • Trainee Actuary, KPMG - Tokyo Japan
  • Executive Actuarial Analyst, Pacific & Orient Insurance Co. Berhad - Kuala Lumpur
  • Instructional Technology Specialist, University of Nebraska-Lincoln - Lincoln NE
  • Associate Actuarial Analyst, Coventry Health Care - Omaha NE
  • Underwriting Service Assistant, State Farm - Lincoln NE
  • Actual Technician, Rockhill Insurance - Kansas City MO
  • Value Chain Analyst, ATS Secured - Omaha NE
  • Actuarial Development Program, Lincoln Financial Group - Omaha NE
  • Actuarial Assistant, Milliman Consulting - Milwaukee WI
  • Teller, Union Bank and Trust - Lincoln NE