Description

Jewish studies is an interdisciplinary program housed in the Norman and Bernice Harris Center for Judaic Studies. The minor in Jewish studies is for students of diverse disciplinary backgrounds who are interested in Jewish cultures and peoples, past and present; the ways in which Judaism and other religious traditions have influenced each other, Near Eastern and Middle Eastern history and politics; and/or the origins and effects of anti-Semitism and other forms of discrimination. Courses in Jewish studies are offered by cooperating faculty in departments in the College of Arts and Sciences, including anthropology, classics, English, history, modern languages and literatures, philosophy, political science, psychology, religious studies, and sociology. Language courses in Biblical Hebrew are available. Students minoring in Jewish studies are eligible for several scholarships awarded by the Harris Center for Judaic Studies.
 

College Admission

The entrance requirements for the College of Arts and Sciences (CAS), including any of the majors or minors offered through the college, are the same as the UNL General Admission Requirements. In addition to these requirements, the College of Arts and Sciences strongly recommends a third and fourth year of one foreign language in high school. Four years of high school coursework in the same language will fulfill the College of Arts and Sciences’ language requirement. It will also allow students to continue language study at a more advanced level at UNL and provide more opportunity to study abroad.

ACADEMIC AND CAREER Advising

Academic and Career Advising Center

The Academic and Career Advising Center in 107 Oldfather Hall is the undergraduate hub for CAS students in all majors. Centrally located and easily accessed, students encounter friendly, knowledgeable people who are eager to help. Students visit the Advising Center in 107 Oldfather Hall to:

  • Choose or change their major, minor, or degree program.
  • Check in on policies, procedures, and deadlines.
  • Get a college approval signature from the Dean's representative, Sr. Director of Advising and Student Success.

While the assigned academic advisor should be the student's primary contact, there are daily walk-ins from 12-3 where a general academic advisor can answer a quick question. In addition, the CAS Career Coaches are located here. They help students explore majors and minors, gain experience, and develop a plan for life after graduation. Not sure where to go or who to ask? The Advising Center team can help.

Assigned Academic Advisors

Academic advisors are critical resources dedicated to students' academic, personal, and professional success. Every CAS student is assigned an academic advisor based on their primary major. Since most CAS students have more than just a single major, it is important to get to know the advisor for any minors or additional majors. Academic advisors work closely with the faculty to provide the best overall support and the discipline-specific expertise.

Assigned advisors are listed in MyRED and their offices may be located in or near the department of the major for which they advise or in the Academic and Career Advising Center. Students who have declared a pre-health or pre-law area of interest will also work with advisors in the Exploratory and Pre-Professional Advising Center (Explore Center) in 127 Love South, who are specially trained to guide students preparing to enter a professional school.

For complete and current information on advisors for majors, minors, or pre-professional areas, contact the Arts and Sciences Academic and Career Advising Center, 107 Oldfather Hall, 402-472-4190, http://cas.unl.edu/advising.

Career Coaching

The College believes that Academics + Experience = Opportunities and encourages students to complement their academic preparation with real-world experience, including internships, research, education abroad, service, and leadership. Arts and sciences students have access to a powerful network of faculty, staff, and advisors dedicated to providing information and support for their goals of meaningful employment or advanced education. Arts and sciences graduates have unlimited career possibilities and carry with them important career competencies—communication, critical thinking, creativity, context, and collaboration. They have the skills and adaptability that employers universally value. Graduates are not only prepared to effectively contribute professionally in the real world, but they have a solid foundation to excel in an increasingly global, technological, and interdisciplinary world.

Students should contact the career coaches in the Arts and Sciences Academic and Career Advising Center in 107 Oldfather, or their assigned advisor, for more information. The CAS career coaches help students explore career options, identify ways to build experience, and prepare to apply for internships, jobs, or graduate school, including help with resumes, applications, and interviewing.

ACE Requirements

 Students must complete one course for each of the ACE Student Learning Outcomes below. Certified course choices are published in the degree audit, or visit the ACE website for the most current list of certified courses.

ACE Student Learning Outcomes
ACE 1 : Write texts, in various forms, with an identified purpose, that respond to specific audience needs, integrate research or existing knowledge, and use applicable documentation and appropriate conventions of format and structure.
ACE 2: Demonstrate competence in communication skills.
ACE 3: Use mathematical, computational, statistical, logical, or other formal reasoning to solve problems, draw inferences, justify conclusions, and determine reasonableness.
ACE 4: Use scientific methods and knowledge to pose questions, frame hypotheses, interpret data, and evaluate whether conclusions about the natural and physical world are reasonable.
ACE 5: Use knowledge, historical perspectives, analysis, interpretation, critical evaluation, and the standards of evidence appropriate to the humanities to address problems and issues.
ACE 6: Use knowledge, theories, and research perspectives such as statistical methods or observational accounts appropriate to the social sciences to understand and evaluate social systems or human behaviors.
ACE 7: Use knowledge, theories, or methods appropriate to the arts to understand their context and significance.
ACE 8: Use knowledge, theories, and analysis to explain ethical principles and their importance in society.
ACE 9: Exhibit global awareness or knowledge of human diversity through analysis of an issue.
ACE 10: Generate a creative or scholarly product that requires broad knowledge, appropriate technical proficiency, information collection, synthesis, interpretation, presentation, and reflection.

College Degree Requirements

College Distribution Requirements – BA and BS

The College of Arts and Sciences distribution requirements are common to both the bachelor of arts and bachelor of science degrees and are designed to ensure a range of courses. By engaging in study in several different areas within the College, students develop the ability to learn in a variety of ways and apply their knowledge from a variety of perspectives. All requirements are in addition to University ACE requirements, and no course can be used to fulfill both an ACE outcome and a College Distribution Requirement.

  • A student may not use a single course to satisfy more than one College Distribution Requirement, with the exception of CDR Diversity. Courses used to meet CDR Diversity may also meet CDR Writing, CDR Humanities, or CDR Social Science.
  • Independent study or reading courses and internships cannot be used to satisfy distribution requirements.
  • Courses from interdisciplinary programs will be applied in the same area as courses from the home/cross-listed department.
College Distribution Requirements
CDR: Written Communication3
Select from courses approved for ACE outcome 1.
CDR: Natural, Physical, and Mathematical Sciences with Lab4
Select from biochemistry, biological sciences, chemistry, computer science, geology, meteorology, mathematics, physics, and statistics. Must include one lab in the natural or physical sciences. Lab courses may be selected from biochemistry, biological sciences, chemistry, geology, meteorology, and physics.
Some courses from geography and anthropology may also be used to satisfy the lab requirement above. 1
CDR: Humanities3
Select from classics, English, history, modern languages and literatures, philosophy, and religious studies. 2
CDR: Social Science3
Select from anthropology, communication studies, geography, political science, psychology, or sociology. 3
CDR: Human Diversity in U.S. Communities0-3
Select from a set of approved courses as listed in the degree audit.
CDR: Language0-16
Fulfilled by the completion of the 6-credit-hour second-year sequence in a single foreign language in one of the following departments: Classics and religious studies or modern languages and literatures. Instruction is currently available in Arabic, Chinese, Czech, French, German, Greek, Japanese, Latin, Russian, and Spanish.
A student who has completed the fourth-year level of one foreign language in high school is exempt from the languages requirement, but encouraged to continue on in their language study.
Credit Hours Subtotal: 13-32

Language Requirement

UNL and the College of Arts and Sciences place great value on academic exposure and proficiency in a second language. The UNL entrance requirement of two years of the same foreign language or the College’s language distribution requirement (CDR: Language) will rarely be waived and only with relevant documentation. See the main College of Arts and Sciences page for more details.

Scientific Base - BS Only

The bachelor of science degree requires students to complete 60 hours in mathematical, physical, and natural sciences. Approved courses for scientific base credit come from the following College of Arts and Sciences disciplines: actuarial science, anthropology (selected courses), astronomy, biochemistry (excluding BIOC 101), biological sciences (excluding BIOS 100 or BIOS 203), chemistry (excluding CHEM 101), computer science (excluding CSCE 10), geography (selected courses), geology, life sciences, mathematics (excluding courses below MATH 104), meteorology, microbiology (excluding MBIO 101), and physics.

See your Degree Audit or your assigned academic advisor for a complete list, including individual classes that fall outside of the disciplines listed above. Up to 12 hours of scientific and technical courses offered by other colleges may be accepted toward this requirement with approval of the College of Arts and Sciences. See your assigned academic advisor to start the approval process.

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation

A minimum of 120 semester hours of credit is required for graduation from the College of Arts and Sciences. A cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0 is required.

Grade Rules

Restrictions on C- and D Grades

The College will accept no more than 15 semester hours of C- and D grades from other domestic institutions except for UNO and UNK. All courses taken at UNO and UNK impact the UNL transcript. No transfer of C- and D grades can be applied toward requirements in a major or a minor. No UNL C- and D grades can be applied toward requirements in a major or a minor. International coursework (including education abroad) with a final grade equivalent to a C- or lower will not be validated by College of Arts and Sciences departments to be degree applicable.

Pass/No Pass Privilege

The College of Arts and Sciences adheres to the University regulations for the Pass/No Pass (P/N) privilege with the following additional regulations:

  • Pass/No Pass hours can count toward fulfillment of University ACE requirements and college distribution requirements up to the 24-hour maximum.
  • Most arts and sciences departments and programs do not allow courses graded Pass/No Pass to apply to the major or minor. Students should refer to the department’s or program’s section of the catalog for clarification. By college rule, departments can allow up to 6 hours of Pass/No Pass in the major or minor.
  • Departments may specify that certain courses of theirs can be taken only on a P/N basis.
  • The college will permit no more than a total of 24 semester hours of P/N grades to be applied toward degree requirements. This total includes all Pass grades earned at UNL and other U.S. schools. NOTE: This 24-hour limit is more restrictive than the University regulation.

Grading Appeals

A student who feels that he/she has been unfairly graded must ordinarily take the following sequential steps in a timely manner, usually by initiating the appeal in the semester following the awarding of the grade:

  1. Talk with the instructor concerned. Most problems are resolved at this point.
  2. Talk to the instructor’s department chairperson.
  3. Take the case to the Grading Appeal Committee of the department concerned. The Committee should be contacted through the department chairperson.
  4. Take the case to the College Grading Appeals Committee by contacting the Dean’s Office, 1223 Oldfather Hall.

Course Level Requirements

Courses Numbered at the 300 or 400 Level

Thirty (30) of the 120 semester hours of credit must be in courses numbered at the 300 or 400 level. Of those 30 hours, 15 hours (1/2) must be completed in residence at UNL.

Residency Requirement

Students must complete at least 30 of the 120 total hours for their degree at UNL. Students must complete at least 1/2 of their major coursework, including 6 hours at the 300 or 400 level in their major and 15 of the 30 hours required at the 300 or 400 level, in residence. Credit earned during education abroad may be used toward the residency requirement only if students register through UNL.

Catalog to Use

Students must fulfill the requirements stated in the catalog for the academic year in which they are first admitted to and enrolled as a degree-seeking student at UNL. In consultation with advisors, a student may choose to follow a subsequent catalog for any academic year in which they are admitted to and enrolled as a degree-seeking student at UNL in the College of Arts and Sciences. Students must complete all degree requirements from a single catalog year. Beginning in 1990-1991, the catalog which a student follows for degree requirements may not be more than 10 years old at the time of graduation.

Requirements for Minor Offered By Department

Eighteen (18) hours of coursework as follows.
 

Core Courses
Select three courses from the following:9
Introduction to the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament
Introduction to Jewish History
Jews in the Modern World
The Holocaust
Literature of Judaism
Credit Hours Subtotal: 9
Additional Related Courses
Select an additional three courses from the following:9
Religion of Late Western Antiquity
The Bible as Literature
Elementary Biblical Hebrew I
Elementary Biblical Hebrew II
Biblical Hebrew Prose
Biblical Hebrew Poetry
The Holocaust in Literature and Film
Introduction to the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament
Judaism and Christianity in Conflict and Coexistence
Israel: The Holy Land
Introduction to Jewish History
Jewish-American Literature
Dead Sea Scrolls
Palestine and the Arab-Israeli Conflict
Ancient Israel
Jews in the Middle Ages
Jews in the Modern World
Jews, Christians and the Bible
The Holocaust
Women in the Biblical World
Modern European Jewish Philosophy
Literature of Judaism
Special Topics in Judaic Studies
Second Temple Judaism
Ethnic Conflict and Identity
Israel and the Middle East
The Jewish Idea in Modern Literature
Philosophy and Religious Belief
Introduction to the Philosophy of History
Philosophy of Religion
Spinoza
Judaism, Christianity and Islam
Ways of Western Religion
Sociology of Race and Ethnicity
Sociology of Religion
Credit Hours Subtotal: 9
Total Credit Hours18

Students are encouraged to meet with the Jewish studies program advisor as early as possible to discuss their intention to pursue the minor. Courses with significant Jewish studies content that are not listed above may be eligible for approval as electives.

Grade Rules

C- and D Grades

A grade of C or above is required for all courses in the minor.

Pass/No Pass

No course taken Pass/No Pass will be counted toward the minor.

JUDS177
The Holocaust in Literature and FilmCrosslisted with MODL 177

Description: Experience of Jews in Europe from 1933-1945. Issues of racism and religious prejudice and assumptions about humanism, tolerance and progress.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Grading Option:Graded with Option

Credit Hours:3

ACE:

JUDS205
Introduction to the Hebrew Bible/Old TestamentCrosslisted with RELG 205

Description: Introduction to the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament in translation. History, culture and religion of Ancient Israel as it is reflected in the biblical books and the archeological record.

This course is a prerequisite for: JUDS 308, RELG 308

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Grading Option:Graded with Option
ACE Outcomes: ACE 5 Humanities

Credit Hours:3

ACE:ACE 5 Humanities

JUDS209
Judaism and Christianity in Conflict and CoexistenceCrosslisted with RELG 209

Description: The history of Jewish-Christian relations from the birth of Christianity until the present. Readings from primary and secondary sources as written by Jewish and Christian authors.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Grading Option:Graded with Option
ACE Outcomes: ACE 9 Global/Diversity

Credit Hours:3

ACE:ACE 9 Global/Diversity

JUDS217
Israel: The Holy LandCrosslisted with HIST 217, RELG 217

Description: Survey of the history of the Land of Israel from Biblical times to the present. Includes Roman and Byzantine rule, the Crusades, Islamic Palestine, Zionism and the modern state of Israel, and the religious importance of the land for Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Grading Option:Graded with Option
Groups:Lat Am,Asian,Mid East,Afr Hist
ACE Outcomes: ACE 9 Global/Diversity

Credit Hours:3

ACE:ACE 9 Global/Diversity

JUDS219
Introduction to Jewish HistoryCrosslisted with HIST 219, RELG 219

Description: Survey of the history of the Jewish people from Biblical times to the present. The Old Testament, Ancient Israel, the Talmud, the relationship to Christianity and Islam, persecution and self-government in the middle ages, Jewish philosophy and mysticism, emancipation, modern anti-Semitism, the Holocaust, Zionism, the modern state of Israel, and the Jewish experience in America.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Grading Option:Graded with Option
Groups:Lat Am,Asian,Mid East,Afr Hist
ACE Outcomes: ACE 9 Global/Diversity

Credit Hours:3

ACE:ACE 9 Global/Diversity

JUDS245J
Jewish-American LiteratureCrosslisted with ENGL 245J

Description: Twentieth and twenty-first century literature by major Jewish-American authors.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Grading Option:Graded with Option
Groups:Literary and Cultural Studies
ACE Outcomes: ACE 9 Global/Diversity ACE 5 Humanities

Credit Hours:3

ACE:ACE 9 Global/Diversity ACE 5 Humanities

JUDS308
Dead Sea ScrollsCrosslisted with RELG 308

Prerequisites: JUDS/RELG 205 or permission.

Description: Dead Sea Scrolls, including the history and thought of the Qumran inhabitants, the archaeology of Qumran, and the corpus of the Scrolls. Concentration on the reading of selected primary texts from the Dead Sea Scrolls.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Grading Option:Graded with Option

Credit Hours:3

ACE:

JUDS313
Palestine and the Arab-Israeli ConflictCrosslisted with HIST 313

Description: Traces the history of the Arab-Israeli conflict from the 19th century up to the present. Explores the role of ideology, political actors, social history, economic and infrastructural problems, and regional and international interaction, as well as prospects for peace in the 21st century. Examines the related historiographical debates, especially those focusing on the Arab-Israeli Wars of 1948 and 1967.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Grading Option:Graded with Option
Groups:Lat Am,Asian,Mid East,Afr Hist

Credit Hours:3

ACE:

JUDS331
Ancient IsraelCrosslisted with RELG 331, HIST 331, CLAS 331

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing.

Description: The cultural, social, and religious institutions of Ancient Israel from their antecedents in the Late Bronze Age until the Great Jewish Revolt and the beginning of Rabbinic Judaism. Literary works and material remains of the Israelites, and evidence from surrounding cultures.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Grading Option:Graded with Option
Offered:FALL/SPR
Groups:Lat Am,Asian,Mid East,Afr Hist Pre-1800 History

Credit Hours:3

ACE:

JUDS332
Jews in the Middle AgesCrosslisted with RELG 332, HIST 332, MRST 332

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing

Pre-1800 content.

Description: Traces the emergence and development of a distinctive Jewish culture and identity in medieval Europe and in the regions bordering the Mediterranean sea from the birth of rabbinic Judaism under the Roman empire until the seventeenth century orthodox synthesis of Talmudic learning, Kabbalah, and custom and Jewish responses to the Englightenment. Includes interaction of Jews with majority cultures (including the development of anti-Semitism), and the impact of Jews and Jewish learning upon western culture.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Grading Option:Graded with Option
Offered:FALL/SPR
Groups:European History Pre-1800 History

Credit Hours:3

ACE:

JUDS333
Jews in the Modern WorldCrosslisted with HIST 333, RELG 333

Prerequisites: Sophomore, junior, or senior standing.

Description: Examines the history of the Jewish people since the 18th century with geographical foci on Europe, North America, and the Middle East. Emphasis on the Jewish Enlightenment, emancipation and assimilation, anti-Semitism, migration to and adaptation in America, Zionism and the modern state of Israel.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Grading Option:Graded with Option
Groups:European History

Credit Hours:3

ACE:

JUDS334
Jews, Christians and the BibleCrosslisted with RELG 334

Description: Jewish and Christian interpretations of the Hebrew Bible and/or Old Testament from 400 BCE to 1800 CE. Readings from the Dead Sea Scrolls and the New Testament, the Church Fathers and the Talmud, medieval and early modern Christian and Jewish biblical commentators.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Grading Option:Graded with Option

Credit Hours:3

ACE:

JUDS339
The HolocaustCrosslisted with HIST 339, HIST 839

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing

Description: Europe-wide programs of persecution and genocide carried out under the auspices of the Nazi-German regime between 1933 and 1945. Focuses primarily on the Jewish dimension of the Holocaust, but also examines Nazi policies targeted against Poles, Gypsies, homosexuals, disabled Germans, and other groups. Events analyzed from the perspectives of victims, perpetrators, and bystanders.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Grading Option:Graded with Option
Groups:European History

Credit Hours:3

ACE:

JUDS340
Women in the Biblical WorldCrosslisted with RELG 340, WMNS 340

Description: Role and status of women as depicted in the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament and the New Testament. The stories and laws concerning women found in the Bible and from extra-biblical evidence.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Grading Option:Graded with Option

Credit Hours:3

ACE:

JUDS345
Modern European Jewish PhilosophyCrosslisted with PHIL 345

Prerequisites: 3 hrs PHIL.

Description: Survey of Jewish philosophy from the eighteenth century to the present. Works of Moses Mendelssohn, Hermann Cohen, Martin Buber, Emanuel Levinas, and others in relation to broad European intellectual movements such as existentialism and phenomenology.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Grading Option:Graded with Option
ACE Outcomes: ACE 5 Humanities

Credit Hours:3

ACE:ACE 5 Humanities

JUDS350
Literature of Judaism

Description: Examination of some principal texts in Jewish religion and philosophy from Biblical times to the 18th Century Enlightenment. The Hebrew Bible, and different approaches to it, as well as portions of the Talmud and the formation of rabbinic Judaism. Writings by philosophers including Maimonides, Saadia, and others, along with narratives, poetry and legends from the 17th and 18th Centuries, which saw the development of Hasidism as well as the emergence of rationalist philosophies.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Grading Option:Graded with Option

Credit Hours:3

ACE:

JUDS388
Women Totalitarian Experience: Culture, Identity and MemoryCrosslisted with CZEC 388, GERM 388

Description: Examination of complexities of women's experience under Nazism and Communism of Central and Eastern Europe.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Grading Option:Graded
Offered:FALL
ACE Outcomes: ACE 5 Humanities

Credit Hours:3

ACE:ACE 5 Humanities

JUDS396
Independent Reading in Jewish Studies

Prerequisites: Permission.

Letter grade only.

Description: Special reading program or research project under the direction of a member of the Jewish Studies faculty.

Course details
Credit Hours:2-4
Max credits per semester:4
Max credits per degree:4
Grading Option:Graded

Credit Hours:2-4

ACE:

JUDS398
Special Topics in Judaic Studies

Prerequisites: Permission.

Description: This course will be used for a variety of different topics.

Course details
Credit Hours:1-3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Grading Option:Graded with Option

Credit Hours:1-3

ACE:

JUDS406
Second Temple JudaismCrosslisted with RELG 406, RELG 806

Description: An in-depth study of the literature, history and culture of Judea and the Jews in the Second Temple period, from 550 BCE to 70 CE. Readings include apocalyptic texts, Wisdom literature, and selections from the Dead Sea Scrolls.

This course is a prerequisite for: JUDS 308, RELG 308

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Grading Option:Graded with Option

Credit Hours:3

ACE:

JUDS476
Ethnic Conflict and IdentityCrosslisted with POLS 476, POLS 876

Description: Theories of natinalism and ethnic conflict. Case studies of Europe, the Middle East, and Africa. The post-Cold War era as multi-polar and multi-cilizational. The states and different cultures that compete for influence and authority to dominate the "New World order." The division of the world along ethnic, religious, and class lines rather than by ideology. The future of international politics and the reassessment of the causes of "conflicts of culture" and their containment.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Grading Option:Graded with Option
Groups:International Relations&Compar

Credit Hours:3

ACE:

JUDS477
Israel and the Middle EastCrosslisted with POLS 477, POLS 877

Description: Israeli politics, society, and relations with its neighbors, particularly the Palestinians. Rise of Zionism and the Palestinian response to it; wars between Israel and Arab neighbors, and the eventual peace agreements between the two; the internal dynamics of Israeli political life; and state of Zionism today.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Grading Option:Graded with Option
Groups:International Relations&Compar

Credit Hours:3

ACE:

JUDS492
Advanced Special Topics in Jewish StudiesCrosslisted with JUDS 892

Prerequisites: Junior/senior/grad standing

Letter grade only

Description: Advanced seminar on special topics taught by Jewish Studies faculty. Typically requires a substantial research project.

Course details
Credit Hours:3
Max credits per semester:3
Max credits per degree:3
Grading Option:Graded

Credit Hours:3

ACE: